Influencers, Kids, COPPA, and Compliance to Kickoff CARU 2020

Jun 16, 2020 by BBB National Programs

 

On May 28, the 2020 CARU Conference officially kicked off with a keynote from the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) Andrew Smith, Director of the Bureau of Consumer Protection. Andrew joined moderator Alice Cahn, Founder of Cahnworks and a legacy name in children’s media, for a virtual fireside chat about the changing landscape of child-directed content over the last few years.

During their conversation, no topics were off the table.

They discussed the rise of content creators and influencers, YouTube’s role in hosting and policing child-directed content, and other digital media platforms that have stirred up controversy and complexity.

“YouTube knew they were directed to kids and became a watershed for COPPA compliance,” said Andrew Smith. He also said that he “believes companies want to do the right thing” and that safe harbor programs, when working properly can help companies navigate COPPA requirements, which he acknowledged is a complicated law. “Most companies in this space are well meaning and interested in compliance. Where they fall down on the job is a lack of understanding of the scope and requirements of the law,” said Smith.

Our speakers spent a decent amount of time discussing COPPA – what it is, its complexity, and the changes that are currently being considered to this important legislation. When discussing potentially raising the age of what is considered a “child,” our speakers engaged in an honest, candid discussion about the complexity of thought behind this type of change. CARU’s vice president, Dona Fraser, said “There is no need to move the COPPA age beyond 12. Young children want to age up to be considered teenagers, so the true challenge we face is addressing the environment in which children of all ages are consuming media. Between television, YouTube, apps, and games we must look deeper at how they are viewing the content.”

At the end of the discussion, which included live Q&A from attendees, our speakers agreed that our goals are aligned. We want a world where parents and kids can have a safe space. Where we can provide a mobile device to a child with confidence while continuing to encourage the development of innovative, educational content for kids.

Watch the full session below and register for other sessions in the 2020 CARU Conference series at caruconference.org. The next session includes Google, Mother Goose Club, and Spark Foundry discussing the balance of managing a digital platform that markets content to kids. Don’t miss it

 

Suggested Articles

Blog

Case Study: Getting to Compliance with CARU and COPPA

In a recent case, CARU worked with TickTalk to help them achieve compliance with CARU’s Privacy Guidelines and the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). CARU sat down with TickTalk once the case had closed to discuss their experience as well as some of the privacy challenges many companies face in the children’s space.
Read more
Blog

What to Know About the Georgia Lemon Law

BBB AUTO LINE provides an overview of each state’s lemon laws. In our ongoing blog series, we offer further insights on the laws for select states, and how BBB AUTO LINE can support consumers with lemon law disputes. Florida, California, and Texas have been covered. This post reviews the nuances of the lemon law in the Peachtree State – Georgia.
Read more
Blog

The TAPP Roadmap: Helping U.S. Companies Responsibly Collect and Manage Teenager Data

Even as data privacy and safety practices that work for adult consumers provide a firm foundation for teens, they simultaneously run the risk of being insufficient to respond to the unique needs of teens. The TeenAge Privacy Program (TAPP) Roadmap was designed to assist any business that wishes to engage proactively with teen consumers, providing an operational framework to map the broad spectrum of potential harms impacting teens onto a concrete set of operational considerations.
Read more
Blog

Pursuing Best Practices For Representation In Advertising

As advertising volume increases, so too do people’s expectations of representation in advertising. Unfortunately, advertising collectively is still falling short, and consumer perceptions reflect that. Why answer this call from consumers? And what is being done about it?
Read more